Oh, Valentine’s Day, you bring us flowers, chocolates, and lots of love. I would like to add some art to this day of love. While pin-up girls may be the first or only thing that comes to mind when erotic art is brought up, erotic art was being made even before the Greeks started painting on walls and pots. (Next time you go to an art museum, look more closely at the Greek art.) While the Greeks saw their erotic art as a representation of dominance and social superiority, there have been artists that were and are condemned for work deemed as “inappropriate.” Regardless, I have collected some images for your enjoyment (or discomfort, whichever the case may be).

These images are purposely erotic, but there is also the argument that all art is erotic. Art reaches into the depths of who we are and tries to get something out of us. It works to stimulate us and connect us to something bigger than ourselves. I suppose, in that sense, all art is erotic.

Look. Listen. Respond.

-Megan

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The Beautiful Belly

February 4, 2013

(This is my belated New Year post.) When a new year begins, it seems that people are pushed into a “reshaping” and “new beginning” gear. We make resolutions to be a better person. We pledge to blog more consistently, or we sign up for the gym or promise ourselves we will use our membership. Not that toned arms and a flat belly are bad things, but I refuse to believe that super skinny is the only way to be beautiful. I’ve collected some images of beautiful bellies, contemporary and classic.

The inspiration for the grouping was Rembrandt’s Bathsheba. The first time I saw this image in a magazine, I became lost in Bathsheba’s soft, sumptuous stomach. Rembrandt’s painting made me long for more paintings of woman with full bodies.

While the slender body is a coveted thing in our society, these paintings are an example of how something classified as less than perfect can be a source of great beauty. This year I hope to find beauty in other hidden places.

Look. Listen. Respond.

-Megan