Spring Flowers Bring

April 3, 2016

Well, it’s the time of year when I get this thing rolling again. Only this year I am finally going to start including some of my own work and its progression. In the past I have avoided doing this for various reasons, but now I not only need motivation for writing but also for creating finished pieces.

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Frida Kahlo

Lately I have been delving into reading about some of my favorite female artists- Louise Bourgeois, Frida Kahlo, and Paula Rego. I have been reflecting on the path I want my own work to take. These women let their work consume them. It was not just something they did, it was a lifestyle. I am working on making my art a lifestyle again.

louise_bourgeois-1990

Louise Bourgeois

 

Paula-Rego-001

Paula Rego

I have been traveling a lot over the past year and half, so the number of larger pieces I have been able to complete has suffered. Mostly I have been working in sketchbooks, using watercolors and colored pencils. Now it is time to take all the experiences and experiments and turn them into something beautiful (or at least completed).

Today has been a big preparation day- putting a base coat of paint down on canvases and paper, selecting images and drawings to combine with memory, and avoiding distractions.

canvas prep

My goals for this year are to implement more collage and mixed media work into my process and to rely more on my inner voice and intuition (as opposed to just relying on the education I’ve had).

I would love to hear about your favorite mixed media artists and about your personal process. I can’t wait to share more of my work and love of art.

Look. Listen. Respond.

-Megan

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Inspiration: Paula Rego

October 22, 2012

Paula Rego has been an influential source for me over the years. Her bold, full-figured women play out scenes that invite you to create your own story, invent your own meaning. Rego’s themes are easy to relate to– power, sexuality, childhood. She uses symbols that have personal meaning, but can also be interrupted differently by the viewer.

Rego makes social commentary by creating her own fairy tales. She does not shy away from bold colors, sturdy women, or uncomfortable imagery. The work above is a small sample of the multitudes of images Rego has created. Her work will always be an inspiration to me.

Look. Listen. Respond.

-Megan

Drive

January 19, 2012

The truth is, I have been horribly lazy about sitting and thinking and writing about art. I have been using Facebook to post images of work in progress. Last semester was a couple months of just pumping out all of the “junk” that was in me, as far as work goes. (That is not to say that I will not make some crap this semester, but I need to draw my focus in, collect my ideas to make something bigger, something cohesive.)

I suppose what I should show what I have been drawing inspiration from over the past couple months. I am lucky to be in classes still, but this is my final semester. There are no more assignments, no more real deadlines. It is just about me, my goals, and my work. So what have I been looking at to keep the drive going?

The House under the Ground by Paula Rego

Convergence by Drew Young

Flemish Proverbs by Pieter Bruegel

Rabbi with Torah by Hyman Bloom

Aspects of a Negro Life: Song of the Towers by Aaron Douglas

by Ignacio Zuloaga y Zabaleta

High Society by Cecily Brown

In Bed by Lautrec

Snowbed by Aron Wiesenfeld

That is the short version of what I have been looking at. I have been getting stack upon stacks of books from the library, as well as grabbing an art magazine from time to time. I hope you enjoy these images.

Look. Listen. Respond.

-Megan